Like it or not, all jobs start with a form of job interview. The good thing is that there are excellent job interview articles on the web for job seekers. The only problem is that most job interview tips are either basic or ridiculous that they are just a waste of time for a potential job seeker. That’s why we have put together this list of “let’s get real” top 7 job interview myths.

Top 7 Job Interview Myths

 

By Catherine Adenle

Now let’s debunk these top 7 job interview myths:

1. The best candidate on the day will get the job

Not always! This is one of the biggest myths out of these top 7 job interview myths. There are many reasons why the most competent people don’t get certain jobs.

  • Some managers will only employ their clones by giving preference to candidates who are similar in background or personality to them.

You can guide against this by listening attentively to the interviewer’s soft spot and what he wants from the ideal candidate. Address any concern directly and weave in the skills to demonstrate your competency.

  • Some hiring managers are prone to making errors of judgement.

Unfortunately, there is nothing you can do about this. Any hiring manager prone to fumbling will fumble spectacularly when it comes to recruiting the best candidates.

  • Some managers may be threatened by your knowledge or think you have too much experience given where the position fits in the organization.

Don’t beat yourself up mentally if you did well but are not selected for the job.

  • You as the best candidate might not fit with company culture.

Working in this kind of environment will not be good for your mental and physical well-being.

  • Your salary expectations may be out of line.

Why settle if you know your worth and the potential value that you can add?

For these reasons above, don’t worry if you’re going up against others who are more qualified than you. You might just be the candidate that the hiring manager is looking for.

2. Compared to the hiring manager, you may be a better interviewer 

In most organisations, interviewing is often part of a manager’s responsibilities. However, in most cases, managers are not trained to conduct interviews or shown interviewing techniques.

So, expect that your interviewer may not know how to properly conduct an interview.

Unfortunately, you may be more prepared for the interview much more than your interviewer. If that is the case, you may be the one to guide the interview so as to ensure that you effectively demonstrate your suitability for the job.

Thorough preparation will help you to stabilize an untrained interviewer. Bluntly, the person interviewing you may rely on first impressions and your comportment, and may not pay deep attention to your well-crafted answers.

See 11 Steps to Ace a Job Interview

3. Be enthusiastic about the role and the company

 Some managers will easily construe your enthusiasm as being too eager for the role. While most employers prefer candidates who are enthusiastic about working for them, it is possible to be too enthusiastic for some other employers depending on the interviewer’s attitude to things in general.

For them, being overly keen makes you look eager and lowers your value as a potential hire. For instance, if you currently have a job and you say you could start the new job right away, for some managers; this could hurt your chances.

4. Always give the “right” answers to job interview questions

There are no sets of right answers. As long as you prepare beforehand with an idea of how you will best answer the most asked interview questions in a positive manner without any awkward silences, your answers should be suitable. The interviewer is not likely to be looking for a particular right answer during your interview. Typically, they pay attention to how you respond and react than the right or wrong answers you give.

See Top 20 Interview Questions and Best Answers

5. Keep your answers sweet and short

Interviewers need you to answer their questions properly, as this helps them not to come up with other related questions. Never pass on the opportunity to demonstrate and sell your skills for the role. Use the STAR or CAR method to do this. Pile in your research and background information on the company as necessary. Be sure to talk during the interview more than half the course of the interview. Consequently, make sure that you have plenty of good and relevant information to give.

6. Ask questions only when you are asked

The more you make the interview look and feel like a conversation, the better. It relaxes the interviewer and it’s good for your own composure. Most of all, it makes a good impression if you are able to ask great questions during the interview. You can have two well-crafted questions for the end, but definitely ask questions as they come up during the interview.

7. Don’t send thank you notes, they are old-fashioned 

Since when has it become old-fashioned to say ‘thank you?’ Trust me, it’s never a bad idea to follow up with the interviewer and thank him for his time. You never know when another role may be available via him. You also want the interviewer to remember you. It’s also a good time to drop in any information about your background, or cover an answer to a question that might have caught you off guard during the interview.

11 Steps

Now that you have explored the top 7 job interview myths, do you have any other job interview to add? If so, let’s hear from you by adding your comment below.

Founder, Catherine's Career Corner. The career site empowering and inspiring ambitious candidates of all ages and professions to thrive and work smarter on their careers. Gladly helping you to explore your career at any stage.

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